Christmas time in a Muslim country is quite different, as you might expect. Of course, it’s not that there are no signs of it, there are. In the malls, there are reindeer and decorated trees. People (usually Muslims) gather around them to take photos.

Many stores have holiday sale signs in their windows; live trees are sold around town, as well as decorations for homes and trees in a variety of international stores. There are a few Christmas concerts at the churches and two or three holiday markets.

Some Muslims do have Christmas trees in their homes. A couple of my Muslim friends do and by the delighted reaction of my husband every year when we put it up, I don’t doubt it.

We have a tree in our house and visited a Christmas market that was held at the American Legation. We’ve had some get-togethers with friends (not necessarily related to the holiday). Other than that, there is not much evidence of Christmas.

I don’t mind it. Really, I don’t need all of the commercialism to remind me of the season of goodwill. I also don’t mind not having all the pressures of gift buying and giving, lots of parties and concerts, and family obligations. Of course, I send a few gifts and words of good cheer to family and close friends, but other than that, I am free of the stress of Christmas.

Usually, we have some visitors for the holidays, but unfortunately, that isn’t happening this year. I will miss old friends and family, but relish my new experiences and all the enrichment that they bring. I never travel to the United States at Christmas. Traveling is too expensive, the weather can be bad, and it adds to stress.

On Christmas Day, things will be as usual here in Morocco. We will probably celebrate quietly at home, as we ready to depart to Marrakech the next day, our present to each other. I wish everyone a stress-free holiday season celebrated in the way that you most desire.

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